What's Happening in Character Education?

What’s the Worst Part of the Lance Armstrong Cheating Scandal?

Posted by Joe Mazzola on Tue, Jan 29, 2013 @ 12:01 PM

I was a big cycling fan before the sport got popular in our country.  And, back in the day, I was a pretty serious cyclist myself--I spoke the lingo, wore the gaudy jerseys, shaved the legs, rode custom racing bikes with “Campy Record” components and I had the muscled-up quads one only gets from logging thousands of miles in the saddle. 

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Topics: integrity, moral character, cheating, teachable moments

Another Sports Hero Turned Fraud? ‘Say It Ain’t So’

Posted by Mark Hyatt on Fri, Nov 16, 2012 @ 10:11 AM

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Topics: character, character education, president's post, moral character, cheating

How can we create more just and democratic schools?

Posted by Adam Williams on Sat, Nov 3, 2012 @ 17:11 PM

In Marvin Berkowitz’s Hot Topic discussion this afternoon, he didn’t hesitate to cut right to the point. “We need to make schools less like prisons,” he said. “When you think about it, it’s disconcerting how much the analogy fits. How can we create more enlightened and just schools?” Marvin’s talk focused on utilizing empowerment and democracy to accomplish this. 

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Topics: CEPLeaders, key lessons, character, character education, CEP2012, cheating, student voice, core values, what works in education, CEPForum10, character education in high school, Character Ed Infused in Curriculum

Preventing Academic Dishonesty Part 3: Students & Peer Pressure

Posted by Melissa Crossman on Tue, Sep 11, 2012 @ 09:09 AM

As you sit in your crowded lecture hall and toil away at that seemingly impossible math problem, you glance down and see a peer in the next row surreptitiously looking at formulas he has scrawled on his hand. This scene sounds quite plausible to many students. Whether they’ve engaged in the behavior themselves or simply witnessed a friend or fellow student cheating, most students are familiar with academic dishonesty. It’s your job, as a moral and upright learner, to take a stand for what you believe in and do your part to combat cheating. If you fail to do so, you’ll be doing yourself and your fellow learners a disservice.

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Topics: role models, integrity, moral character, cheating, student voice

Preventing Academic Dishonesty Part 2: What Teachers Can Do

Posted by Melissa Crossman on Tue, Jun 12, 2012 @ 10:06 AM

From a teacher’s perspective, cheating is both a major hassle and a serious disappointment. When students cheat, teachers must bother first with catching the cheating and then with dispensing punishment. They’ll also have to deal with feelings of disappointment in students they’d trusted as they know cheating is a demonstration of the student’s failure to follow a moral path.

 

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Topics: moral character, cheating, core values, teachable moments

Preventing Academic Dishonesty: What Parents Can Do

Posted by Melissa Crossman on Wed, May 30, 2012 @ 14:05 PM

Cheating, or academic dishonesty as many schools refer to the practice, is a problem that continues to persist in the field of education. And for teachers who aim to fill their students’ heads with knowledge and prepare them for the future, this is a serious issue. When students cheat they fail to fully engage in the learning process and, as such, will likely not acquire the knowledge necessary for later-life success.

Whether students engage in this type of behavior in online classes or as part of their traditional, brick-and-mortar schooling, it will necessarily adversely affect their learning. While parents may not be able to prevent their children from cheating, they can reduce the likelihood that their students make academic dishonesty a common practice by engaging in frank discussions and being on the lookout for cheating.

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Topics: parent involvement, cheating, teachable moments

Does 'Teaching to the Test' Actually Encourage Cheating?

Posted by Mark Hyatt on Fri, Jan 27, 2012 @ 16:01 PM

“Teachers matter,” said President Obama this week in his State of the Union address. “Instead of bashing them, or defending the status quo let’s offer schools a deal. Give them the resources to keep good teachers on the job, and reward the best ones. In return, grant schools flexibility: To teach with creativity and passion; to stop teaching to the test; and to replace teachers who just aren’t helping kids learn.”

We at the nonprofit Character Education Partnership (CEP) share this concern because “teaching to the test” can deceive stakeholders into thinking students are doing better than they really are. But in the current environment, we are even more alarmed by how the testing status quo seems to be adversely affecting the integrity of our education system, itself.

Recent revelations of widespread testing fraud in Atlanta's public schools are just the latest examples of a disturbing national trend that should finally force all of us who care about education to ask some uncomfortable but unavoidable questions. Chief among them: Has a national over-emphasis on standardized testing actually created a monster that is eroding the character of K-12 education?

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Topics: character, cheating, testing, no child left behind