What's Happening in Character?

Melissa Crossman

Recent Posts

Preventing Academic Dishonesty Part 3: Students & Peer Pressure

Posted by Melissa Crossman on Tue, Sep 11, 2012 @ 09:09 AM

As you sit in your crowded lecture hall and toil away at that seemingly impossible math problem, you glance down and see a peer in the next row surreptitiously looking at formulas he has scrawled on his hand. This scene sounds quite plausible to many students. Whether they’ve engaged in the behavior themselves or simply witnessed a friend or fellow student cheating, most students are familiar with academic dishonesty. It’s your job, as a moral and upright learner, to take a stand for what you believe in and do your part to combat cheating. If you fail to do so, you’ll be doing yourself and your fellow learners a disservice.

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Topics: cheating, integrity, student voice, moral character, role models

Preventing Academic Dishonesty Part 2: What Teachers Can Do

Posted by Melissa Crossman on Tue, Jun 12, 2012 @ 10:06 AM

From a teacher’s perspective, cheating is both a major hassle and a serious disappointment. When students cheat, teachers must bother first with catching the cheating and then with dispensing punishment. They’ll also have to deal with feelings of disappointment in students they’d trusted as they know cheating is a demonstration of the student’s failure to follow a moral path.

 

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Topics: cheating, core values, moral character, teachable moments

Preventing Academic Dishonesty: What Parents Can Do

Posted by Melissa Crossman on Wed, May 30, 2012 @ 14:05 PM

Cheating, or academic dishonesty as many schools refer to the practice, is a problem that continues to persist in the field of education. And for teachers who aim to fill their students’ heads with knowledge and prepare them for the future, this is a serious issue. When students cheat they fail to fully engage in the learning process and, as such, will likely not acquire the knowledge necessary for later-life success.

Whether students engage in this type of behavior in online classes or as part of their traditional, brick-and-mortar schooling, it will necessarily adversely affect their learning. While parents may not be able to prevent their children from cheating, they can reduce the likelihood that their students make academic dishonesty a common practice by engaging in frank discussions and being on the lookout for cheating.

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Topics: cheating, parent involvement, teachable moments